4. The domus and the Roman road of Palazzo Cordellina

There is evidence of the discovery in the 18th century, during the construction of the palazzo, of materials and structures from the Roman era, including the emblem of a geometric, dichromatic mosaic. The black and white tiles form a triaxial pattern of circles intersecting in six points within a larger circle. The pre-sence of wealthy Roman homes beneath the palazzo is confirmed by what emerged during the excavations conducted by the Veneto Regional Board for Archaeological Heritage between 2004 and 2009. This contributed to enriching our knowledge of the urban and building landscape of the ancient Vicetia.
A stretch of a minor road, of which only a few worn paving stones remain, was equipped with a pavement and a channel for the draining of water. The Roman road sits on an older moat, dating back to pre-Roman times, which constituted the limit of the ancient Veneto settlement. The paved road was lined with workshops and domus, the perimeter walls of which remain today, along with a single gateway. Of the internal rooms, a few mosaic and cocciopesto (lime mortar with fragments of mosaics and bricks) floor surfaces remain, as well as a terracotta duct to control the outflow of water. Significant remnants of the early Medieval settlement, eroded by the foundations of the palazzo structure, confirm the continuity of life in this portion of the ancient city.

L’area in corso di scavo (Archivio Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici del Veneto)

The excavation area (Archive of the Veneto Regional Board for Archeological Heritage)

La strada romana con solchi carrai e marciapiede (Archivio Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeologici del Veneto)

The Roman road with vehicle tracks and pavement (Archive of the Veneto Regional Board for Archeological Heritage)