15. The via Postumia

Recent excavations for the refurbishment of the cellar of the “al Ceppo” deli have brought to light a complex stratigraphy with the traces of medieval and renaissance buildings. A reused trachyte slab was found in the foundations of what could have been one of the “tower houses” known to have been located in the neighbourhood near Santa Corona. It is a “crepido”, part of the sidewalk that flanked the Roman road known as the via Postumia, which used to run adjacent to the site.
By the middle of the 2nd century AD, northern Italy was fully in the Roman sphere of interest, and the Roman Senate decreed the construction a large road that was to connect the northern Tyrrhenian Sea and the northern Adriatic Sea.
In 148 AD, the consul S. Postumio Albino organized the construction of the via Postumia, which linked Genoa and Aquileia. It entered the Veneto region south-west of Verona, and traced earlier known routes connecting the major “pre-Roman” urban settlements, including Vicenza, Oderzo and Concordia.
The via Postumia, which reached Vicenza on a route along the foothills, entered the city at Porta Castello and crossed its centre, becoming the “decumanus ma-ximus”, the main axis of the town around which the Roman city was organized (the current corso Palla-dio). After crossing Vicenza, the Via Postumia passed the Ponte degli Angeli and continued, to the north-east, towards Oderzo and Aquileia.

View of the excavation area from the south (Archive of the Veneto Regional Board for Archeological Heritage)

View of the excavation area from the south (Archive of the Veneto Regional Board for Archeological Heritage)

Reused trachyte slab from the pavement of the Roman road (Archive of the Veneto Regional Board for Archeological Heritage)

Reused trachyte slab from the pavement of the Roman road (Archive of the Veneto Regional Board for Archeological Heritage)